The Pennsylvania Circle of Ancient Philosophy


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Call for Papers March 2018 Conference

Pennsylvania Circle of Ancient Philosophy
Annual Conference
Pennsylvania State University
Friday March 23 – Sunday March 25, 2018
Call for Papers: Due Tuesday, December 5, 2017

Keynotes: Dr. Agnes Callard, University of Chicago
Dr. Joel Schlosser, Bryn Mawr College

Workshop Leaders: Dr. Walter Brogan, Villanova University (Heraclitus)
Dr. David Kaufman, Transylvania University (Philodemus)
Kris McLain, Pennsylvania State Univ. (Ancient Women Philosophers)

Scholars, graduate students, and advance undergraduates are encouraged to submit their work in any area of Ancient Greek and Roman philosophy and cognate fields (e.g., rhetoric, political theory, medicine, history). Special consideration will be given to authors working or living in Pennsylvania. This year the conference will be hosted at Penn State.

About PCAP:
The Pennsylvania Circle of Ancient Philosophy (PCAP) aims to foster a community of scholars committed to the study of ancient philosophy. To this end, PCAP provides the opportunity for Pennsylvania graduate students and faculty to meet and present papers at its annual conference. Additionally, PCAP organizes other events throughout the year, including workshops, intensive seminars, and group translation projects.

Guide for the submission abstracts:
There are two types of submissions accepted for this conference, for “Paper sessions” and “Workshop presentations.” Indicate which in the subject line of your email, with enclosure in PDF form, to: PennAncient@gmail.com (to which you may also address informational questions). You may submit both types in separate emails.
1. Paper sessions: Paper sessions will allow 30 minutes for presentation and discussion.
a. Abstracts should be 600 words
b. Include a representative bibliography
c. Prepare your abstract for blind review (no identifying names/information).

2. Workshop presentations: This conference will include three pedagogical workshops – 90-120 minute structured round-table discussions about topics relevant to teachers of ancient philosophy. We solicit participants for these round-tables who can address, in 5-10 minutes, ways to include texts from the relevant persons/topic in a philosophy curriculum or research program. Participants need not be experts in the relevant field.
a. Topics (1) Heraclitus, (2) Philodemus, (3) Ancient Women Philosophers
b. Include a detailed description of the content of the presentation and your                            fit for the relevant round table of about 400 words.

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